Discussion: Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition

#1

Continuing the discussion from Anchored Instruction and Its Relationship to Situated Cognition:

Discuss: Anchored Instruction and Its Relationship to Situated Cognition. (1990). Educational Researcher, 19(6), 2–10. doi:10.3102/0013189x019006002

Post your response by Thursday. Reply to at least two posts. At least one response much be after Thursday.

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Anchored instruction. Is there any other way?
Anchors for Anchored Instruction
I Agree with Anchored Instruction
Anchored Instruction... It Just Makes Sense
Anchored Instruction: Gilley
Discussion: Free and Open Source Tools
Reply to @akelley from Chante' Hendrix
Agree to Agree with Anchored Instruction
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Anchors away! Discussion on Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition
Anchors away! Discussion on Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition
Anchored Instruction Discussion
#2

I totally agree @Rgilley! Giving students real life situations in order to learn only helps that learning process become more “real.” I remember in school how I’d sit in Pre-Cal and wonder when the crap I’d use this in real life! If there had been some sort of real-world lesson with it, I probably would have paid attention a little better :blush:

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#3

Continuing the discussion from Discussion: Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition:

I love this article. I believe that anytime we can engage our children with a new learning strategy is a plus. “It is so hard to get children to think outside of the box.” Watching a video to help engage children to ask questions about real life situations is very effective. Giving them something they can relate to, is the best way to get children thinking and motivated. I love how this article gives explicit lesson on how they use this in math and Social Studies. SO often we are told to use “attention getters” but are never really given examples.

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#4

Continuing the discussion from Discussion: Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition:

I love this article. I believe that anytime we can engage our children with a new learning strategy is a plus. “It is so hard to get children to think outside of the box.” Watching a video to help engage children to ask questions about real life situations is very effective. Giving them something they can relate to, is the best way to get children thinking and motivated. I love how this article gives explicit lesson on how they use this in math and Social Studies. SO often we are told to use “attention getters” but are never really given examples.

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#5

Continuing the discussion from Discussion: Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition:

Here’s my Anchored Discussion response…not sure I’m posting this in the correct place

I honestly had not heard the term “anchored instruction” before reading this article, but I am very interested in it now. The concept just seems to make sense. In one example (the Sherlock research), the students were using the same information to learn about two completely different subjects. They were learning language arts through the study of characters, plot, and setting. They also were able to learn about history by discussing time period. Asking the children to point out and discuss different aspects of the stories (i.e., the arrow to the head discussion), allows the students to get engaged in what they’re learning and they honestly probably didn’t even realize it. The Jasper research is also very intriguing. I’m wondering if the authors continued creating the Jasper series. Using the videos of real-world problems seems like it would be much more interesting to students (as opposed to reading word problems). I also liked how during instruction the students have to figure out the problems, before they can even solve them.
This kind of teaching seems like it would certainly be more effective than sitting in a classroom reading from a textbook. The students were able to take what they watched (Sherlock, Jasper, etc.) and research what they needed to in order to find out new information. They weren’t given a book in which to look up information. They were taken to the library where they had to find their own information. I’m hoping to teach Kindergarten, so using this kind of instruction may be challenging, but I hope to figure out how to make it work one day.

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#6

My fault again! I moved it to where it goes. . .

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#7

I agree that anchored instruction could be a very useful tool in the classroom. It is a way to get students more involved in their learning and hopefully make it more meaningful to them. I also loved how they connected multiple subjects into a lesson in their example.

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#8

Continuing the discussion from Discussion: Anchored Instruction and Situated Cognition:

Anchored instruction was something I had never heard of but will now be implementing in my own classroom. Anchored instruction is a way to make what we teach our students meaningful and long-lasting. It is a way that we can teach and encourage ourselves and our students to dig deeper and explore. Connecting the students to knowledge is so important and this can be done through anchored instruction. I love how the author of the article suggested having the students learn through multiple perspectives. A good example of this would be conducting a science experiment as a scientist or delivering a biography report dressed as the person the report was done on. The goal is to connect our students to what they are learning and help them to achieve a relationship with the information. The article explained “The Young Sherlock Experiment,” that I thought was very interesting. I loved how this experiment encouraged meaningful and interactive conversations in the class and I would love to figure out a way to connect this to younger grades.

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#9

I agree @Rgilley I love the examples they gave and actually used lessons that we could use in our classroom for their research.

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#10

Yes @Hannah_Still that’s exactly it! I couldn’t quite put my finger on it, but it is connecting students to what they’re learning instead of just learning information that they may or may not use in life. Knowing that what they’re learning is important outside the classroom certainly gets the students way more engaged.

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#11

I had not heard of the term “anchored instruction” before, but I try to do similar things in my classroom. It is very hard for students to see where we use all the math that they learn in real life. As a math teacher, I try so hard to show them where and when these tools will be used. Many times though, we run out of time and we are forced to teach the procedures of math and don’t let students explore. I try my best to allow my students to explore what we are doing before any “method” is shown to them. I think that the Common Core is trying to do this in a sense. Many people do not like the Common Core standards because it is something they are not familiar with. The Common Core standards are meant for students to not memorize, but to conceptually understand what is going on. From what I understood from the article, this is anchored instruction. We want the students to be engaged in their learning and we need to relate each subject to each other to give it meaning. Reading from a textbook everyday and computing procedural mathematics is not going to leave a lasting impact on our students and they will not remember what they’ve learned!

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#12

I think it’s so important to use real life examples that make sense to our kids. I teach middle school math and as often as I can I relate what we are doing to MONEY! My kids may not be able to add and subtract very well with positive and negative numbers, but the second I bring money into the situation it all makes sense to them. We need to make all the topics that they are learning real life to our students for them to actually remember what they are learning!!!

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#13

I love this and could not agree with it more. To me, it is a must that we engage our children with new learning strategies, every day. This not only helps them in the meanwhile, but in the long run. The more we introduce to them, the more skills they attain as they continue on in life. Skills that they will be able to go through in their arsenal as new material gets presented to them, day by day. Presenting them with interactive videos to get them engaged and asking questions, or giving them something to relate to has always been a successful tactic to me and what I have seen over the years. If something is able to be related to, then automatic cognition occurs. This article gives great examples on their usage of this in Social Studies and Math, and really solidify the idea of attention grabbing as we are always taught to do, but can not always come through. The students in the Jasper research example made a prominent point. They used what they watched, researched to find even more information, and were taken to the library to search for more information for themselves. I find this amazing, and totally can see myself using this technique teaching 9th-12th grade as I plan to. Their arsenals were full, to say the least!

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#14

Exactly, @Hannah_Still You just hit the nail on the head, for me! I could not quite relate it together like you did, but it is all about connecting the students to the material, rather than forcing things down their throats regardless of their responses to it. Throwing information at them that they may/probably won’t use in life is about as productive as throwing it out of the window of a car. That is what they are doing with it, anyway. I definitely feel that if the students know that what they are in the process of learning/will learn that year, then engagement levels will sky rocket! I sure wish I did more engaging growing up. You have to learn it at some point, so might as well start early, and have your whole life to critique what is necessary!

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#15

I truly believe in authentic learning and making lessons relevant to students’ lives. I had never heard the terms anchored instruction or situated cognition. I found that they related back to all of my learning about making lessons relevant and creating hands on experiences. Problem solving is an important skill that includes both finding the problem and its answer. I agree that it is important for students to not only answer the question but to be able to formulate the problem from the information given. Students have a more meaningful experience when they are allowed to immerse themselves in the learning and to look at problems from many angles. We can make learning more meaningful to students by allowing them to make connections with their everyday lives and by allowing them to think about problems from many view points. Teaching them to seek out or to remember information given to them is an important part of this type of instruction. Students must also learn to transfer knowledge from one area to another. I like the idea of using visuals over text when doing this type of learning. I think it gives opportunities to different types of learners who may not normally be involved when using a text only style. This type of learning gives all students a chance to look at a problem from many different perspectives. I think that anchored instruction can be useful in the classroom because it teaches problem solving skills that can be used in students’ everyday lives. The young Sherlock and Jasper programs were great examples of ways to bring problem solving, collaboration, and discussion into the classroom.

@pfaffman did I post this correctly by replying to your message?

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#16

@econn I agree with you that [quote=“econn, post:11, topic:2997”] Reading from a textbook everyday and computing procedural mathematics is not going to leave a lasting impact on our students and they will not remember what they’ve learned! [/quote]

Students are more likely to remember things that they can apply to their everyday lives. They need to know why we are teaching them the things that we are teaching them. Only then can they see the importance of what they are learning, and they can make the connections to their lives. When something becomes important or they can make the connection, students are more likely remember the information they have learned.

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#17

I found this article interesting, because it was written almost 26 years ago! I think this goes to show that engaging students in videos and integrated problem solving challenges still increases transfer in students. Anchored instruction allows teachers to create environments for students to explore and understand problems. Educators today still use anchored instruction; however, it has been modernized and it may be referred to as Project Based Learning (PBL).

Now, more than ever, we should include videos in our instruction. When this article was written in 1990, children were not glued to their iPhones and TVs. Our students’ attention span has gotten shorter and shorter over time. In order to keep our students actively engaged, we should use videos frequently. According to the article, videodisc help students develop pattern recognition skills, give a more truthful depiction of events, and allow teachers to “instantly access information for discussion.” This all remains true for videos we use in our classrooms.

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#18

According to Forbes’ “The 10 Skills That Employers Most Want in 2015 Graduates,” solving problems is one of the top things an employer looks for when hiring new college graduates. If we teach our students to problem solve when they are young, this lifelong skill will help them become top prospects in the business world. This past year, I had my kindergarteners complete several STEM activities. Most of the activities gave the students a problem that they had to solve. Some of the really “smart” students struggled or even cried, because there was no right or wrong answer. I was surprised when my lower students were able to solve the problem. Even though we want our students to be smart, we need to encourage solving problems.

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#19

@jmwilson , I guess I didn’t pay any attention to when it was written. I’m a dumby and kept wondering why they were using the word videodisc. I should know better…I guess 7th graders rub off on me.

Anyway, being that this is from so long ago, it’s so interesting that what was true then is true now. We have got to keep out students engaged and one way that seems to work is technology. Like you said, they can’t get their noses out of it anyway, so let’s incorporate it into our lessons to hopefully engage our students!

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#20

The aspect that I found particularly interesting is that authentic learning develops student knowledge from novice to expert. Students can choose their learning paths while still applying the knowledge and skills that they’ve acquired. Their reading becomes purposeful and will help in achieving the overall learning goal; therefore, the opportunity to provide sustained thinking is invaluable.

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