Discussion: Free and Open Source Tools

Continuing the discussion from Reading: Asing-Cashman's Free and Open Source Tools (FOSTs):

Read:

Asing-Cashman, J. G., Gurung, B., Limbu, Y. B., & Rutledge, D. (2014). Free and Open Source Tools (FOSTs): An Empirical Investigation of Pre-Service Teachers’ Competencies, Attitudes, and Pedagogical Intentions. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 26(1), 66-77. http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/pdf/IJTLHE1754.pdf

Reply to this message (Not reply-as-linked-topic as for a challenge) with your response to the article by Thursday, June 20. You should respond to at least 2 people’s posts, and at least one of those responses should be after June 20. (These used to say June 16, but apparently no one noticed to do this before June 16, so I moved it to June 20.)

3 Likes

Continuing the discussion from Discussion: Free and Open Source Tools:

I don’t think I’m posting this in the correct way… help!

Here’s my response…

This was probably one of the most relevant studies I’ve read about recently when it comes to teaching. Technology and use of technology is a must in the classroom (and in life really). I feel like I’m decently tech savvy, but I’m learning WAY more than I ever imagined in just the first few weeks of this class. I think that will only help me in my classroom. I used to work in local TV news and we told all of our … let’s say… experienced anchors (aka older) that they had to get on this social media bandwagon to stay relevant. Many resisted, but soon saw the benefit. I can see that translating to the classroom. Where teachers who have been in the field for many, many years may resist using some of the FOSTs as part of their lessons and lessons plans, but in order to reach their students and teach them as effectively as possible, we have to embrace FOSTs in our everyday lives and lessons.

3 Likes

This is my response to the article.

This article was very well written and made me understand the importance of technology in the classroom, especially the class rooms of the future, like the ones I will be teaching in over the next several years and decades. Technology will always be evolving and with that students will be evolving with the technology. The overall arching goal for teachers is to make a learning impact on their students and they must do that in the most effective way possible. Personally, I would not have learned as well if I would have learned the “old fashion” way of just a pencil and paper. Some of my favorite times were playing games on the smart boards, watching movies, and other technological learning innovations. FOSTs can help teachers as well as students become more productive with their time and resources. This article is a must for anyone planning to teach in the future.

1 Like

I agree about how many of the…(older)…teachers involved in art put up a very obstinate fight against the immersion of technology to stay relevant as well! Luckily in my case, once they saw the benefits of providing high quality pictures of paintings they started to see the bright side eventually!

1 Like

@steven23 back in my day (geez I sound old) we did “paper and pencil” learning and I am envious of today’s students (and your age group, too I guess!) who have all of these wonderful technological ways of learning.

1 Like

@Bmorgans I was thinking about using FOSTs in a general classroom, I didn’t even think about how important those tools would be for arts classes! My dad is a retired band director and (if he could figure it out), I bet he would have loved using some of these tools in his arts and humanities classes that he taught in addition to his band program.

2 Likes

Here’s my response:

As technology increases, I think it must increase in the classroom. I feel that technology keeps the students engaged, if implemented correctly. Classroom management is so important to keep students on task and I feel that technology can help that. Most students are going to know more about these new technologies before the teacher will. We need to be open to learning about these technologies. Another thing to remember is that these students are the future and the future is technology. If we don’t teach using these technologies out there, our students will be lost in the “real world.”

@pfaffman did I post this in the correct place??

4 Likes

@steven23 I agree with you about learning with paper and pencil only. I feel that when I was in school there was a good balance of paper and pencil with the use of technology. I did not have smart boards when I was in high school, but we did use computers frequently. I think there is still a place for paper and pencil learning, but that we need to also incorporate technology to keep students current with the world around them.

1 Like

@econn I agree with the balanced approach. I see that you teach 7th grade math. I understand with math there is a lot of pencil and paper for solving problems. When I did my teaching observations, about a month ago, I was under a 9th grade math teacher and he used a lot of games with the smart board to help students and I felt like it helped on the written test. I graduated high school in 2012 and over a four year span I could tell that technology has advanced a long ways in the classroom.

@akelley My age group was at the beginning of the technological advances such as smart boards and other devices. I went in the classroom last month for a teacher observation and since I graduated high school in 2012 there have been several advancements. We use to get in trouble for having phones and tablets, now it is common place and allow students to interact by playing games that allow them to learn. If a majority of the students have smart phones, tablets, and even some schools provide chromebooks for students, let them use it for a learning cause instead of punishing them, unless it is known they are texting, listening to music, or on social media. There is a lot of good to technology in the classroom, but there is is also a lot of distraction. As teachers and future teachers we must use it to connect with students.

1 Like

So, you just click the “reply” link like you do when replying to people’s posts.

Ooops. I put it in the wrong topic, so you couldn’t reply. Mea cupla.

Thanks for getting things started. I moved them . . .

1 Like

Yes, because it was impossible for you to post where I had intended for you to post.

2 Likes

It seems like people are responding to this article as if its argument was “Technology is really, really good” rather than “If you are going to use software, you should really, really consider using Free Open Source Software.” You know how this week you also learned about Microsoft Office Alternatives?

These guys cited a piece of mine in an obscure journal. They should have instead cited my article in TechTrends (“It’s time to Consider Open Source Software”, doi:10.1007/s11528-007-0040-x — free if you use the proxy server). Perhaps I should have assigned that instead.

1 Like

Continuing the discussion from Discussion: Free and Open Source Tools:

This article was a very interesting read. I agreed with many angles of it (even though many of those oppose over use of technology in the classroom) however, I also dis-agreed with some aspects. Most of my dislike of technology stems from past educational experiences in an instructional setting. When higher Technology was being first introduced in my high school (the smart board) many teachers were just as lost as were were on its intent and purposes and they were the ones who were expected to teach us from it! Anyways, the teachers were so clueless about how to go about this giant “smart” board so most of the time the time we were supposed to be learning a lesson from it was spent watching the teacher figure out how to use it. Then, once they did figure it out, most of them were so fed up with it that they would slap something up there that was quick and irrelevant or busy work that was not interactive with the technology at all just to get it out of the way. So I agree with the article when it stated that education and technology should be integrated with “meaningful learning activities” that included active, constructive and cooperative learning. Basically, if they are going to be used, they have to have a reason and they have to make sense to the content!

However, most of my attempts at technology, like this class and a precious digital graphics class, have been successful which resulted in great confidence! I took a digital graphics class in college that even though was a struggle, ended up being one of my favorite classes. Not exactly because of the technological aspect but the integration of my field (art) with technology and how effective it turned out! The article made a great point when it stated “Students find strong motivation in the feeling that they are in control of their own learning.” Take this class for example, when I first opened this page and saw all the content and due dates and assignments I freaked out a little. This panic did not abate until about the second week when all the big words in the assignment titles started to make sense. It all comes with practice and being an artist, and impatient, practice is not something that comes naturally to me ESPECIALLY when it involves technology…but I am learning and loving it!

link to article: https://literatecomputing.com/t/reading-asing-cashmans-free-and-open-source-tools-fosts/2994

  • I saw the note in the rules not to reply as link like we would a challenge but I could not find the reply button at the bottom where it normally is!

I commented on the only other available post that I saw

1 Like

Incorporating technology is pointless unless there is meaningful learning behind it. We need to keep students focused and on task in the classroom and using technology can help accomplish that. Technology grasps the students attention, but we need to make sure that it is actually accomplishing the standard that we are teaching.

2 Likes

That’s what I thought…but I just followed what was happening! Just wanted to make sure I would receive credit for it. Thanks!

2 Likes

This article was very relevant for me even though I am not one of the “native” users they talk about. I have always had a love hate relationship with technology, and this article made me understand that a little more. Before starting this class I would have said that my competency was mediocre and my self efficacy low. I had not thought much about using technology in the classroom, other than the occasional Youtube video, or lessons that had to have it. This study makes sense in that competency is a predictor of attitude and use. This class has made me see technology in a different light. I’m more excited to learn and more confident about what I am doing. I am now more likely to use technology in my classroom and have an open mind about learning new things. I feel like the more I learn about technology and about FOSTs, the more likely I am going to bring them into the classroom. I think the FOST’s are important resources for teachers to learn more about, so they can bring them into the classroom. I didn’t know about Libre or that there was anything like it, before today. FOST’s allow more people to use the technology that is out there and opens the door for more technology to be used in the classroom. FOSTs are great because they are already being used by the next generation of computer users, and they are free, easy to use, and allow creating and sharing. If we are going to use software, why not use the free software! I am now seeing the bigger picture when it comes to this class. Thanks @pfaffman.

1 Like

I’m older and it is hard for me to embrace technology sometimes. I am getting better though. What is great about FOSTs is that they are free and user friendly. I can find an open source tool and start learning how to use it without worrying about if I’m buying the right thing or how much it costs. The fact that everyone has access is great. FOSTs are actually a great way for me to continue to learn about all the things I can do with technology. You are right by saying technology keeps you relevant.

Enjoyed reading, “It’s time to Consider Open Source Software”. It’s hard to reply when people aren’t talking about FOSTs, and they are just talking about how they like technology. :disappointed:

3 Likes